Futurized - thought leadership on the future
Regenerative Business

Regenerative Business

July 27, 2021

Alan Moore, Designer, Consultant, and Author, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about what regenerative business practices truly entail which is to go well beyond sustainability. We discuss how beauty gives us the oxygen needed and how we need to reclaim it, giving ourselves, as architects, designers, creators or innovators, the permission to think about that mysterious, awesome concept and reality of beauty. 

After listening to the episode, check out Alan Moore's social media profile, his company Beautiful Business, and his most recent book, Do Build:

My takeaway is that reclaiming the concept of beauty is transformational both on a personal and a planetary scale, but it cannot happen without introspection, courage, and the power of example. Wonder, joy, and walking in nature can approximate beauty and can give us the inspiration to pursue it in our professional lives. The effects would be healing for the planet, which seems really needed right now, objectively speaking.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 90, Upskilling Youth for the 21st Century Bioeconomy, episode 73, The Future of Social Learning, or episode 66, [The Serendipity of Social Innovation.

Futurized—conversations that matter.

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Sustainable Norway

Sustainable Norway

July 20, 2021

Kristian Bye, Director Innovation Norway San Francisco and Palo Alto, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about sustainable entrepreneurship, and the recent systemic innovation policy implemented by Norwegian strategy at a governmental level resulting in a focus on research and development, grants and funding that incent greentech innovation.

After listening to the episode, check out:

My takeaway is that [stimulating certain types of innovation at the governmental level is important and can be influential, but does not alone drive overall innovation in the same direction. Entrepreneurs think independently and cannot so easily be incentivized. But working with entrepreneurs in mind certainly helps although in Norway's case, the legacy of stimulating oil and gas production has been far more important and there is a lot of catch up to do to become a leading voice in sustainability. So, sustainable Norway may have both dollars and vision behind it now, but it will, in many people's minds, need to prove its transformational intent throughout this decade to be credible.]

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 102, [The Geotech Decade], episode 70, [The Future of Cleantech], or episode 58, [Building the Southern California of Tomorrow].

Futurized—conversations that matter.

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The Future of Consciousness

The Future of Consciousness

July 13, 2021

Divya Chander, PhD, Neuroscientist, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how Divya Chander became a physician, neuroscientist, futurist, entrepreneur with the twin passions for exploring the brain and space. I ask her what dreams are. We discuss heightened states of awareness and get to the topic of consciousness: what is it and how to alter it? Divya gets into optogenetics: targeted activation or silencing of light-sensitive protein channels selectively expressed in neurons and how she uses the EEG waveform to monitor brain activity during anestesia. We talk about the Augmentation movement: who are they and what do they want? We explore the body's electric circuitry and eventually get to space travel within and beyond our solar system. Divya is helping to figure out how to create human hybernation and is also involved with SETI, the search for extraterrestrials. Finally, we discuss the need for regulation in outer space. I'll stop here, I think you just have to listen to the episode to find out more. It's a long one.   

After listening to the episode, check out:

Trond's takeaway: In outer space, and when space traveling humans come back, I shall fear humans more than the unknown, such as aliens. Beyond that, I find human augmentation both fascinating and frightening. It will undoubtedly happen, in fact, it is already happening. How soon? How extreme? What will the impact ultimately be? I quite enjoy talking to smart people who think about these things and are involved in shaping our future.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 84, The Origins and Future of Open Science, episode 79 on Futuristic AI, or episode 68 on Industrial-grade Mixed Reality.

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Can the US catch up with the Globalization of Sci-Tech?

Can the US catch up with the Globalization of Sci-Tech?

July 6, 2021

Melissa Flagg, Senior Fellow, Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), Georgetown University, and Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Geotech Center, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author.

In this conversation, we talked about Melissa Flagg's upbringing in Missouri, her pharma PhD, road-trip in all 50 states, how she is currently trying to turn moonshine into gin, her shamanic journey, and her views on security, sci-tech, and defense innovation. Why does US policy pretend it is 1975? The decentralization of sci-tech globally and why has the US not noticed? Emerging security threats and challenges. Widening the scope of security threats to environmental challenges (pandemics, climate change). Finally, we discuss science and optimism. 

After listening to the episode, check out 

Trond's takeaway "Sci-tech is in a global state but governments are still in their national state. How long can this last? Regions such as the EU have made great strides to internationalize funding and collaboration, so have many smaller, agile nation states. China is rising faster than almost anybody had predicted both in research dollars, number of researchers, and in specific, strategic domains such as AI. Can the US get away with not doing so? Can it still lead? Does it even currently lead? Many questions here, and a lot of change underway."

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 69 on the The Future of Quantum Security, episode 14 on Post-pandemic Tech, or episode 84 on The Origins and Future of Open Science.

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DeepFakes are getting Real

DeepFakes are getting Real

June 29, 2021

Kathryn Harrison, CEO and founder of FixFake, and founder of Deep Trust Alliance, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author.

In this conversation, we talk about fake news, content wars, cybersecurity, synthetic media, digital avatars, AR/VR, computer-generated imagery (CGI), AI-assisted video calls, fake celebrity porn videos, deep learning specifically Generative Adversarial Nets (GAN) and how people have been editing people’s faces on pictures since the internet started. To what extent is this just innovation and where does it get serious?

After listening to the episode, check out Deep Trust Alliance as well as Kathryn Harrison's social media profile:

Trond's takeaway: "DeepFakes was until quite recently an esoteric topic. We had all seen innocent versions of it on playful apps, but I think many of us assumed it would be easy to tell the real thing. Not any more. The ramifications are enormous. We will soon not know what reality is. We cannot trust documentaries. We risk that others try to misrepresent us online--but also in the real world. What will this do to an already broken trust between people and media institutions? What happens to privacy? What happens to cybersecurity? We should count ourselves lucky that there are people like Kathryn Harrison watching our back. But is it enough? I'm left with more questions that when I started."

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 102, The Geotech Decade, episode 69, The Future of Quantum Security, or episode 28, The Future of Child Trafficking.

Futurized—conversations that matter. 

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DeFi’s impact on Business and Society

DeFi’s impact on Business and Society

June 22, 2021

Julian Hosp, CEO and co-founder of Cake DeFi, interviewed by futurist Trond Arne Undheim.

In this conversation, we talk about how DEFI emerged and what problems it fixes. We cover the problems in centralized finance—centralized control, limited access, inefficiency, lack of interoperability, and opacity. We then discuss the future of the DeFi industry.

After listening to the episode, check out Cake DeFi as well as Julian Hosp's social media profile:

Trond's takeaway: DeFi is now more than a niche phenomenon, it is already in the real world of finance, used for payment, currency creation, and credit scores. DeFi might just alter banking as we know it, but don't count out centralized institutions taking a key role in its rollout, since blockchain can serve many purposes, including contribute to maintaining the status quo.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 99, Blockchain uncapitalism on desktop PCs, episode 59, The Tokenization of Securities, or episode 44, The Future of Open Finance.

Futurized—conversations that matter. 

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The Future of Medicine is Invisible

The Future of Medicine is Invisible

June 15, 2021

Bertalan Meskó, Director of The Medical Futurist Institute, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author.

In this conversation, we talk about the emergence of rapid healthcare transformation. Current best practices. We cover the many disruptive forces affecting medicine. How to track trends? What will medicine look like in the next decade? We discuss the advance of digital health and beyond. I find out how Bertalan tracks signals from sci-tech, startups, stakeholder dialogue, and visionary thinking and how he experiments on himself, testing out each medical innovation before recommending it or ever writing or speaking about it. 

After listening to the episode, find out more about The Medical Futurist and check out Bertalan Meskó's social media profile.

Trond's takeaway: "Bertalan's notion that the future of medicine is invisible, seamless, and preventive is a great vision to have. In my own forthcoming book, Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset, which is forthcoming on Routledge this fall, I make the point that the grand challenges of our time demand that we coordinate better than ever before. Shaping the future requires being aware of the opportunities and able to capitalize on them. That's where Bertalan is brilliant, making us all aware of the opportunities."

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, watch Futurized Podcast on YouTube, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 88, The Future of Virtual Care, episode 82, The Future of Digital Health AI, or episode 55, AI for Medicine.

Futurized conversations—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

Blockchain uncapitalism on desktop PCs

Blockchain uncapitalism on desktop PCs

June 8, 2021

Tomer Afek, Co-founder of Spacemesh, the web-scale smart contract system that lets anyone run blockchain computation from home on their desktop PC, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about how current methods for coin distribution, such as ICOs, airdrops, participation in mining pools and IEOs all have serious deficiencies and that the problem of providing extremely low barrier-to-entry remains as yet unsolved.

Instead the promise of blockchain is to create a cryptocurrency that is highly usable as means of payment between any two people in the world without any possibility of censorship.  Spacemesh utilizes unused disk space on ordinary desktop PCs to run the network. Evening out the chances of the disadvantaged is what gives Tomer hope and purpose.

After listening to the episode, find out more about Spacemesh and check out Tomer Afek's social media profile.

Trond's takeaway: "Cryptocurrency could be an answer to banking the unbankable, but that social stratification cannot typically be undone just by technology alone. As blockchain goes from free experimentation among the cyber libertarians and rapidly will become a business-to-business enabled platform, too, we need to keep a watchful eye on how those with few means can gain entry into the financial system. Web scale smart contracts and access to cryptocurrencies that don't require expensive computing resources or excessive computer talent, would seem to be a necessary ingredient."

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org, on YouTube, or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 42, The Future of Cryptocurrency, episode 66, The Serendipity of Social Innovation, or episode 59, The Tokenization of Securities.

Futurized conversations.

 

Free Speech on Social Media

Free Speech on Social Media

June 1, 2021

Bill Ottman, CEO & co-founder of Minds, an open source, crypto-based social network, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how can we solve social media censorship issues and violations of free speech, but still filter out illegal content? What technologies are key to disrupting social network change for good? Censorship in the digital age. Platform control among big tech and how it is achieved at times to the detriment of privacy. We discuss Bill's notion of "extractive media". We discuss surveillance issues in "closed" media. We also discuss the emergence of alt media and crypto social media that respect privacy and try to reward creators. 

After listening to the episode, find out more about Minds and check out Bill Ottman's social media profile.

Trond's takeaway: Free speech is a contentious issue on social media these days. The balance between free speech and censorship is a delicate one, and one that is never fully resolved. Whether it is legal, ethical, or commercial deliberations behind it, free speech is an ideal not a reality online. What constitutes hate speech? What good is censorship if questionable speech always finds an outlet? What is a fair business model for the future of social media? Is it time to truly break up big tech? What would we get instead? Many questions here, on Futurized we are not there to conclude, only to ask questions. There will be more questions in the time ahead.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 71, How To Fix Fake News?, episode 51, The Future of Peer-to-Peer, or episode 29, The Future of Computational Media.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

The Geotech Decade

The Geotech Decade

May 25, 2021

David A. Bray, Inaugural Director of the GeoTech Center at the Atlantic Council, the esteemed Washington DC-based think tank, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about the Report of the Commission of Geopolitical Impacts of New Technologies and Data (GeoTech Commission). The report, which will be released on May 26, provides an extensive set of recommendations for the United States and its like-minded allies to thrive in a decade defined by data and technology collaboration and competition. I ask David these questions and more: What is the Geopolitics of Tech? Why is this report and Commission important? What does the report recommend and how is this different from other Commissions? How does the Commission hope to socialize and scale its recommendations into tangible actions? What has the process of writing it looked like? What are the main recommendations? What are the implications for the next decade?

After listening to the episode, find out more about the GeoTech Commission's report, Atlantic Council, check out David A. Bray's profile on Singularity University or connect with him on LinkedIn.

Trond's takeaway: The GeoTech Commission has conducted great work. The recommendations, whilst perhaps not themselves groundbreaking, are each quite important, are communicated well, and would make great impact on the proactive role of the United States in the world of technology and risk at large, and would make one small step towards a better decade. I'm particularly thrilled by David's comment that this is destined as much towards innovators and entrepreneurs as towards governments and policymakers. That's what governance will take as we move more deeply into this decade. The important stakeholders are changing, the shapers of tomorrow are not the shapers of yesterday. 

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 48, The Future of AI in Government, episode 46 Parliamentary Tech and Hypertransparency, or episode 84 The Origins and Future of Open Science.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

Practicing Multimodal AI

Practicing Multimodal AI

May 18, 2021

Slater Victoroff, CTO and founder of Indico, the enterprise AI startup, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how Slater was picking trash off of the Wellesley dump for school engineering projects, loves Chinese fantasy fiction Xianxia- with its immortal heroes, his experience at Techstars, founding a startup, and how startups beat juggernauts like IBM spending billions of dollars. We discuss how his company Indico practices multimodal AI, a set of blended techniques that make data sing. We muse about the future one where citizen data scientists contribute to better problem framing driven by subject matter experts. 

Having listened to this episode, check out Indico's well as Slater Victoroff's online profile:

Trond's takeaway: The secret to making money with today's AI techniques seems to lie in blending various approaches, being able to handle a myriad of data sources, and meshing it together without losing the context and stumbling along making predictions that make sense even though the underlying dimensions are seldom fully understood, using transfer learning approaches. I would personally hope we could get a few steps further soon, so the explainability also increased. We will get there soon enough, I guess. Let's see if the technology is weatherproof and whether we can get there without another AI winter. I find it refreshing to talk with smart people who are also humble. That's why my bet will be on folks like Slater to build these systems for the future. 

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. Check out @futurized2 on Instagram, @futurized2 on Twitter, or our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/FuturizedPodcast

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 74, AI Talent Diversity, episode 79 Futuristic AI, or episode 48, The Future of AI in Government.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Seed VC Trends: Founder Obsession

Seed VC Trends: Founder Obsession

May 11, 2021

Tyler Norwood, Partner at Antler, the global early stage venture capital firm, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how Tyler got into venture. We discuss betting on founders, teams and people. We cover the role of pivots, failures, and learning fast and slow. We discuss seed stage metrics, how to reduce risk, and how to ensure max upside. We spend some time on what it means to run a 'platform VC' and what best practice is (at Antler, Alpaca, others). What does the market look like? What's the seed investing outlook next decade? What are the differences between US and globally for VCs and startups?

Having listened to this episode, check out Antler as well as Tyler Norwood's online profile:

Trond's takeaway: Being a platform VC is a good way to go, because founders need all the help they can get, and money is not sufficient to provide from the early investor's side. Founders should become choosers, it's the only way to turn the tide for a more fair early seed stage experience for a diverse set of founders.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 70, The Future of Cleantech], episode 61, The emergent Arabian startup scene, or episode 47, How to Invest in Sci-Fi Tech?.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Orchestrating the Freelance Economy

Orchestrating the Freelance Economy

May 4, 2021

Matt Coatney, CTO at HBR Consulting, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talked about the book Matt Coatney co-authored, The Human Cloud: How Today's Changemakers Use Artificial Intelligence and the Freelance Economy to Transform Work. From routinized, repetitive assembly line work towards project oriented work--in all sectors. Enablers--AI, globalization, cloud platforms, shadow IT. Limitations-structure, regulations, organizational blockers. Future outlook: orchestration as the key human skill, industry- and task-specific cloud collaboration platforms.

My takeaway is that the freelancer economy is all about orchestrating people and technologies at a distance. This is not easy. As more and more intense and complex project oriented work takes place outside the remits of the traditional workplace, team, leadership and management skills need to increase in magnitude and quality. The sweet spot is where the enabling technology meets the challenges of human connection and productivity. The experimentation and the debate will only intensify in the years to come.

Having listened to this episode, check out HBR Consulting as well as Matt Coatney's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 49 Living the Future of Work, episode 41 episode 41 The Future of Work or episode 78 The Next Generation Marketplaces.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

Two Author-Podcasters Discuss Tech

Two Author-Podcasters Discuss Tech

April 27, 2021

Peter High, President of Metis Strategy, Host of Technovation podcast, and 3x author, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about how Peter High came to host of The Technovation podcast (2008-) and get into Enterprise IT. How Trond Undheim came to host the Futurized podcast (2020-). We discuss the new book by Peter High: Getting to Nimble--a framework and best practices companies can use to transform their people practices, processes, technologies, ecosystems, and strategies for the digital era (2021). We also discuss a new book by Trond Undheim: Future Tech: How to Capture Value from Disruptive Industry Trends (2021), which contains case studies of how to apply the forces of disruption framework and its components: tech, regulation, business models, social dynamics. Peter shares his secrets of podcasting: a podcast is an album--greatest hits get pulled through columns, books, speeches and combos. Finally, we discuss the future of enterprise & IT.

Having listened to this episode, check out Getting to Nimble, Future Tech, the Technovation and Futurized podcasts, as well as Peter High and Trond Undheim's online profiles:

Trond Undheim: "My takeaway is that there is significant value in having frameworks to guide our thinking on change in organizations, business and society in the digital era. Where Peter focuses on the transformation of people, practices, processes, technologies, ecosystems, and strategies in his book Getting to Nimble, I focus on five components: tech, regulation, business models, social dynamics, and the environment in my book Future Tech--and indeed in this podcast, Futurized. As Peter and I discovered, there's significant overlap in our perspectives but we also come from very different places. Peter's audience is CIOs, my audience is broader, which makes him the smarter one in terms of targeting. I'm not sure who of us gets to have more fun, but I thoroughly enjoyed talking to Peter. One should be very fortunate to work with him, I think."

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 49 on Living the Future of Work, episode 41 The Future of Work, or episode 41 The Future of Industrial Operations.

Workforce, Humanity, and Future Tech

Workforce, Humanity, and Future Tech

April 20, 2021

Alexandra Levit, 8x author, speaker, and career expert, interviewed by Trond Undheim, futurist and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about the future of careers and strategic HR. We discuss a recent book by Levit: Humanity Works: merging tech and people for the workforce of the future (2019). Alexandra and I agree that there is lots of work required to integrate tech in the workforce. Paradoxically, it requires hard, human work to adapt to new realities. We then discuss a brand new book penned by myself, Trond Undheim: Future Tech: how to capture value from disruptive industry trends--a framework for understanding tech/society (2021).  We talk about the trends of co-working, remote work, portfolio careers, gig economy, design thinking, workplace culture, experience retail, applied tech skills, the importance of training. We also discuss the future and what that entails for the workforce and for how technology will evolve. 

Having listened to this episode, check out Humanity Works, Future Tech as well as Alexandra Levit and Trond Undheim's online profiles:

  • Humanity Works: https://www.amazon.com/Humanity-Works-Merging-Technologies-Workforce/dp/0749483458
  • Future Tech: https://www.amazon.com/Future-Tech-Capture-Disruptive-Industry/dp/1398600326
  • Alexandra Levit (LinkedIn, Twitter: @alevit): https://www.alexandralevit.com/
  • Trond Undheim (LinkedIn, Twitter @trondau): https://trondundheim.com/

My takeaway is that paradoxically, the future of technology is not so much about tech as it is about getting the human part right. We need to train, retrain, and adapt. We will spend more time doing that than actually developing new technology. Also, successful technology requires being in close touch with its prospective users. Failing that, technology fails. The Future of work can be bright for young people if they are proactively explore the opportunities in front of them. Conversely, the world we have already entered rewards creativity and initiative. Without that, any trend, technology or otherwise, will come as an unpleasant surprise.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 49, Living the Future of Work, episode 41, The Future of Work, or episode 71, Future Tech - a preview. Keep in mind that so far, there are over 20 episodes of Futurized that tackle the Future of Work, so you may wish to browse more episode using the categories and search function provided on the Futurized.org website.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Upskilling Youth for the 21st Century Bioeconomy

Upskilling Youth for the 21st Century Bioeconomy

April 13, 2021

Natalie Kuldell, Executive Director & founder, BioBuilder Educational Foundation, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about synthetic biology for all, bringing engineering into life science and about deep science in classrooms. We discuss disruptive forces (tech, regulation, business models, social dynamics). We discuss skills shortage initiatives, biomanufacturing jobs, business models, exciting startups such as Ginkgo Bioworks and Asimov. She explains Biobuilder.org's pivot to online during COVID-19, scaling the efforts to the rust belt, community science, and community labs such as Genspace, BosLabs, BioCurious, Biogen Community Lab, Bricobio, and (iGEM) Foundation Jamboree. Finally, we discuss next decade's self-taught scientists and agri-bio revolution in rust belt farming communities.

Having listened to this episode, check out BioBuilder Educational Foundation as well as Natalie Kuldell's online profile:

My takeaway is that synthetic biology must become a skillset of every young person. They need it to understand the world they will grow up in. It will increasingly become a life skill, perhaps even a survival skill depending on how the world goes. "Citizen science is more than looking at stars, and looking at birds", says Natalie. For sure. Deep science is cool and it needs to be cool for a while. That much is certain.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 22 The Future of Engineering Education, episode 36, The Future of Cultured Meat, or episode 81, 2x Community Science -- Cancer Map and COVID-19 Testing in Schools.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

The Future of Vertical Farming

The Future of Vertical Farming

April 6, 2021

Eddy Badrina, CEO of Eden Green, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about whether indoor grown food is equally healthy? How has the space of vertical farming emerged? We discuss the demand for organic food, environmental concerns, soil quality depletion, groundwater depletion, and chemical pollution. Eddy explains the main distinctions and concepts, including Greenhouses, Hydroponics, Aeroponics, Aquaponic, Vertical farming, and the various growth vectors, such as greenhouse, shipping container, skyscraper, or warehouse. We discuss sensors, climate control, LED lighting. How do you define the vertical farming market? Who are the players? Which disruption forces are most actively influencing the field of vertical farming right now? How does he stay up to date? How does he recommend my listeners (and I) stay up to date? Looking at the next decade, I ask Eddy what he thinks will happen to vertical farming? We discuss high yield local food production in inner cities, near deserts, on islands, on in space and beyond

My takeaway is that vertical farming is poised for growth, and I don't just mean that as a pun. There are legitimate reasons why foodtech is exploding right now. Food and Ag coupled with tech is necessary, exciting, and is becoming scalable. Can the costs of vertical farming come down? Will we see vertical farms in every country and every municipality? Time will show.

Having listened to this episode, check out Eden Green as well as Eddy Badrina's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 87 Performance Food, episode 52 The Future of Peer-to-Peer, or episode 36 The Future of Cultured Meat.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Gig Mobility

Gig Mobility

March 30, 2021

Ryan Green, CEO & co-founder, Gridwise, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about whether gig mobility services (MaaS) become the standard for how to move in cities? What does the future of driver intelligence look like? We discuss the emerging market size and key verticals  such as transportation, city government, real estate, and financial services. We cover disruptive forces and barriers such as COVID-19, security, data protection, and IP. I ask Ryan about the exciting startups he sees in the space and we discuss the next decade's autonomy, data sharing, and mobility-as-a-service adoption.

My takeaway is that gig mobility is becoming the standard for how to move in cities. We are moving into a period with a hybrid fleet of various degrees of human and autonomous driving enabled. The quest for data and the question of who owns it, will also hit transportation. Being a connector between different mobility services is an interesting space to be in, a role one would have expected national, regional and city governments to occupy, but now becoming a battleground for large mobility players as well as emerging startups. Are we at the cusp of the truly smart city? Just maybe but there's going to be dumb infrastructure challenges remining for some years to come.

Having listened to this episode, check out Gridwise as well as Ryan Green's online profile:

  • Gridwise (@gridwise_io): http://www.gridwise.io/
  • Ryan Green: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryanagreen/

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 3, The Remaking of Transportation, episode 82, The Future of Grid Energy Innovation, or episode 16, The Future of Human Perception AI.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

The Future of Virtual Care

The Future of Virtual Care

March 23, 2021

Dr. Joe Kvedar, Professor of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, author, editor, advisor and telehealth evangelist, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about the history Telehealth and it's transformation into a two-channel delivery system combining in-person and virtual care. A precursor in the field, Joe charts the 20 year evolution from "show me the data" to "how do I implement?". We briefly discuss the use case of Melanoma therapy and AI/imaging from Kvedar's own field, dermatology. We discuss COVID-19 effects and other disruptive forces. Joe shares the startups he sees disrupting the game and how he stays up to date. We cover the emerging two-channel care delivery system and discuss the future of virtual care in the next decade.

My takeaway is that Telehealth has come a long way in 20 years and it's not just about the technologies, but it is also about adapting to a hybrid model of care where you each time select the communication mode that best serves the patient given the constraints, and still is efficient for the health system at large. The future of virtual care is up for grabs, it is already starting to look different from five years ago. Leapfrogging seems entirely possible and we will see new winners but also old champions rise to the challenge having invested time and resources in the area for decades. What's certain is that both infrastructure and skills will need to evolve with the challenges and opportunities ahead.

Having listened to this episode, check out Harvard Medical School as well as Dr. Joe Kvedar's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 19, Digital Health in Future Pandemics, episode 55 AI for Medicine, or episode 82 The Future of Digital Health AI.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Performance Food

Performance Food

March 16, 2021

Luci Gabel, Nutritionist, Adjunct Professor at San Jose State University, and author of Eat to Lead, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about Luci's own path to healthy eating. We go through a brief history of diets, from low Fat, low Carb, Atkins, Veg, Organic, Low Sugar, and Keto. I ask Luci about best practices from her Eat To Lead book, we get into the Dynamic Lifestyle Roadmap and get the lowdown on Fruit, Carbs, Protein and Fat. We discuss microbiome awareness as well as her Five-Star restaurant secrets. Lastly, we hit on the emerging future of personalized wellness, longitudinal nutrition research, longevity, brain health, tech, and increased performance.

My takeaway is that performance food is not yet here but it will be. When it is, hopefully the lessons can be shared widely. For now, we have precursors like Luci, who are inviting each of us to be more mindful of what we eat and watch the results closely. Clearly, positive effects can be had, but we still don't fully understand the cause and effect. Nutrition is indeed a topic for the future. We should Eat to Lead, that's a great aspiration.

Having listened to this episode, check out Eat To Lead as well as Luci Gabel's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 2 on The Future of Beverages, episode 36 Future of Cultured Meat, or episode 80 The Future of Personal Development.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

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