Futurized - thought leadership on the future
The Geotech Decade

The Geotech Decade

May 25, 2021

David A. Bray, Inaugural Director of the GeoTech Center at the Atlantic Council, the esteemed Washington DC-based think tank, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about the Report of the Commission of Geopolitical Impacts of New Technologies and Data (GeoTech Commission). The report, which will be released on May 26, provides an extensive set of recommendations for the United States and its like-minded allies to thrive in a decade defined by data and technology collaboration and competition. I ask David these questions and more: What is the Geopolitics of Tech? Why is this report and Commission important? What does the report recommend and how is this different from other Commissions? How does the Commission hope to socialize and scale its recommendations into tangible actions? What has the process of writing it looked like? What are the main recommendations? What are the implications for the next decade?

After listening to the episode, find out more about the GeoTech Commission's report, Atlantic Council, check out David A. Bray's profile on Singularity University or connect with him on LinkedIn.

Trond's takeaway: The GeoTech Commission has conducted great work. The recommendations, whilst perhaps not themselves groundbreaking, are each quite important, are communicated well, and would make great impact on the proactive role of the United States in the world of technology and risk at large, and would make one small step towards a better decade. I'm particularly thrilled by David's comment that this is destined as much towards innovators and entrepreneurs as towards governments and policymakers. That's what governance will take as we move more deeply into this decade. The important stakeholders are changing, the shapers of tomorrow are not the shapers of yesterday. 

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 48, The Future of AI in Government, episode 46 Parliamentary Tech and Hypertransparency, or episode 84 The Origins and Future of Open Science.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

Practicing Multimodal AI

Practicing Multimodal AI

May 18, 2021

Slater Victoroff, CTO and founder of Indico, the enterprise AI startup, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how Slater was picking trash off of the Wellesley dump for school engineering projects, loves Chinese fantasy fiction Xianxia- with its immortal heroes, his experience at Techstars, founding a startup, and how startups beat juggernauts like IBM spending billions of dollars. We discuss how his company Indico practices multimodal AI, a set of blended techniques that make data sing. We muse about the future one where citizen data scientists contribute to better problem framing driven by subject matter experts. 

Having listened to this episode, check out Indico's well as Slater Victoroff's online profile:

Trond's takeaway: The secret to making money with today's AI techniques seems to lie in blending various approaches, being able to handle a myriad of data sources, and meshing it together without losing the context and stumbling along making predictions that make sense even though the underlying dimensions are seldom fully understood, using transfer learning approaches. I would personally hope we could get a few steps further soon, so the explainability also increased. We will get there soon enough, I guess. Let's see if the technology is weatherproof and whether we can get there without another AI winter. I find it refreshing to talk with smart people who are also humble. That's why my bet will be on folks like Slater to build these systems for the future. 

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. Check out @futurized2 on Instagram, @futurized2 on Twitter, or our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/FuturizedPodcast

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 74, AI Talent Diversity, episode 79 Futuristic AI, or episode 48, The Future of AI in Government.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Seed VC Trends: Founder Obsession

Seed VC Trends: Founder Obsession

May 11, 2021

Tyler Norwood, Partner at Antler, the global early stage venture capital firm, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about how Tyler got into venture. We discuss betting on founders, teams and people. We cover the role of pivots, failures, and learning fast and slow. We discuss seed stage metrics, how to reduce risk, and how to ensure max upside. We spend some time on what it means to run a 'platform VC' and what best practice is (at Antler, Alpaca, others). What does the market look like? What's the seed investing outlook next decade? What are the differences between US and globally for VCs and startups?

Having listened to this episode, check out Antler as well as Tyler Norwood's online profile:

Trond's takeaway: Being a platform VC is a good way to go, because founders need all the help they can get, and money is not sufficient to provide from the early investor's side. Founders should become choosers, it's the only way to turn the tide for a more fair early seed stage experience for a diverse set of founders.

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 70, The Future of Cleantech], episode 61, The emergent Arabian startup scene, or episode 47, How to Invest in Sci-Fi Tech?.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Orchestrating the Freelance Economy

Orchestrating the Freelance Economy

May 4, 2021

Matt Coatney, CTO at HBR Consulting, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talked about the book Matt Coatney co-authored, The Human Cloud: How Today's Changemakers Use Artificial Intelligence and the Freelance Economy to Transform Work. From routinized, repetitive assembly line work towards project oriented work--in all sectors. Enablers--AI, globalization, cloud platforms, shadow IT. Limitations-structure, regulations, organizational blockers. Future outlook: orchestration as the key human skill, industry- and task-specific cloud collaboration platforms.

My takeaway is that the freelancer economy is all about orchestrating people and technologies at a distance. This is not easy. As more and more intense and complex project oriented work takes place outside the remits of the traditional workplace, team, leadership and management skills need to increase in magnitude and quality. The sweet spot is where the enabling technology meets the challenges of human connection and productivity. The experimentation and the debate will only intensify in the years to come.

Having listened to this episode, check out HBR Consulting as well as Matt Coatney's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 49 Living the Future of Work, episode 41 episode 41 The Future of Work or episode 78 The Next Generation Marketplaces.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

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