Futurized - thought leadership on the future
Gig Mobility

Gig Mobility

March 30, 2021

Ryan Green, CEO & co-founder, Gridwise, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about whether gig mobility services (MaaS) become the standard for how to move in cities? What does the future of driver intelligence look like? We discuss the emerging market size and key verticals  such as transportation, city government, real estate, and financial services. We cover disruptive forces and barriers such as COVID-19, security, data protection, and IP. I ask Ryan about the exciting startups he sees in the space and we discuss the next decade's autonomy, data sharing, and mobility-as-a-service adoption.

My takeaway is that gig mobility is becoming the standard for how to move in cities. We are moving into a period with a hybrid fleet of various degrees of human and autonomous driving enabled. The quest for data and the question of who owns it, will also hit transportation. Being a connector between different mobility services is an interesting space to be in, a role one would have expected national, regional and city governments to occupy, but now becoming a battleground for large mobility players as well as emerging startups. Are we at the cusp of the truly smart city? Just maybe but there's going to be dumb infrastructure challenges remining for some years to come.

Having listened to this episode, check out Gridwise as well as Ryan Green's online profile:

  • Gridwise (@gridwise_io): http://www.gridwise.io/
  • Ryan Green: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryanagreen/

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 3, The Remaking of Transportation, episode 82, The Future of Grid Energy Innovation, or episode 16, The Future of Human Perception AI.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

The Future of Virtual Care

The Future of Virtual Care

March 23, 2021

Dr. Joe Kvedar, Professor of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, author, editor, advisor and telehealth evangelist, interviewed by Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author.

In this conversation, we talk about the history Telehealth and it's transformation into a two-channel delivery system combining in-person and virtual care. A precursor in the field, Joe charts the 20 year evolution from "show me the data" to "how do I implement?". We briefly discuss the use case of Melanoma therapy and AI/imaging from Kvedar's own field, dermatology. We discuss COVID-19 effects and other disruptive forces. Joe shares the startups he sees disrupting the game and how he stays up to date. We cover the emerging two-channel care delivery system and discuss the future of virtual care in the next decade.

My takeaway is that Telehealth has come a long way in 20 years and it's not just about the technologies, but it is also about adapting to a hybrid model of care where you each time select the communication mode that best serves the patient given the constraints, and still is efficient for the health system at large. The future of virtual care is up for grabs, it is already starting to look different from five years ago. Leapfrogging seems entirely possible and we will see new winners but also old champions rise to the challenge having invested time and resources in the area for decades. What's certain is that both infrastructure and skills will need to evolve with the challenges and opportunities ahead.

Having listened to this episode, check out Harvard Medical School as well as Dr. Joe Kvedar's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 19, Digital Health in Future Pandemics, episode 55 AI for Medicine, or episode 82 The Future of Digital Health AI.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

Performance Food

Performance Food

March 16, 2021

Luci Gabel, Nutritionist, Adjunct Professor at San Jose State University, and author of Eat to Lead, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about Luci's own path to healthy eating. We go through a brief history of diets, from low Fat, low Carb, Atkins, Veg, Organic, Low Sugar, and Keto. I ask Luci about best practices from her Eat To Lead book, we get into the Dynamic Lifestyle Roadmap and get the lowdown on Fruit, Carbs, Protein and Fat. We discuss microbiome awareness as well as her Five-Star restaurant secrets. Lastly, we hit on the emerging future of personalized wellness, longitudinal nutrition research, longevity, brain health, tech, and increased performance.

My takeaway is that performance food is not yet here but it will be. When it is, hopefully the lessons can be shared widely. For now, we have precursors like Luci, who are inviting each of us to be more mindful of what we eat and watch the results closely. Clearly, positive effects can be had, but we still don't fully understand the cause and effect. Nutrition is indeed a topic for the future. We should Eat to Lead, that's a great aspiration.

Having listened to this episode, check out Eat To Lead as well as Luci Gabel's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 2 on The Future of Beverages, episode 36 Future of Cultured Meat, or episode 80 The Future of Personal Development.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

The Origins and Future of Open Science

The Origins and Future of Open Science

March 9, 2021

George Strawn, computing policy nestor, interviewed by, interviewed by host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist, investor, and author. 

In this conversation, we talk about the Origins and Future of Open Science. We investigate the decisions that turned ARPAnet into the global internet and the first ISP via educational institutions. We discuss the rise and fall and rise again of the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House, the role of the National Academies in the US and abroad, the path towards open science with open access, preprint servers, and why big science publishers resist it. George muses on the role of science and data in the next decade.

My takeaway is that the origins of open science and the internet were a combination of savvy futuristic planning, and surprising twists and turns. The magnitude of the changes have been felt by all. The future of open science still looks open ended, but the promise of bottom-up self-regulation is more alluring than the alternative, a regulatory grab to avoid damaging lock-in effects. Data is the new business model, but the holders of big data become the arbiters of human destiny. Can we achieve George's vision of one computer, one dataset? The implications would be world-changing.

Having listened to this episode, check out National Academies as well as George Strawn's online profile:

Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars.

If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 84 The path towards Science 2.0, episode 48, The Future of AI in government or episode 29 Future of Computational Media.

Futurized—preparing YOU to deal with disruption.

 

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